Terrain

Terrain

Where does nature stop and where does man begin? The work In the Fleshby Katja Bjørn makes the ambiguous gap between the human body and its worlds its principle of form. In a closed, darkened room, a video is projected onto a large, curved panoramic screen that embraces and envelops the viewer. On the semi-circular screen, two bodies or limbs move slowly into, up, and into each other, creating a moving, horizontal horizon line in the image surface. The interaction between the folds of the body folds is brought to life by the negative shadow between them by constantly moving and by imperceptibly switching between form and motif, body and landscape. In the pixelated shadow game, barren plains, distant horizons, coastlines, seas and beaches come into view - all in continuous amalgamation, roll-back and flow. The relationship between the body and the world is presented as a negotiation between the boundary and extent of the terrain and the skin's tactile approach to both the world and the other's skin. The dynamic embrace of the motif is enhanced by the curvature of the installation and the capture of the viewer, who can never know for sure whether the screen shows something cosmically infinite or one of the electron microscope's alien mosses. In the landscape we can be big or small, we can get lost, stay away and find homes; we can conquer the terrain or disappear in it; destroy or embrace it. Self-body is just one of the horizons we balance on, the one we meet the world with, but also the one we are given who can never know for sure whether the screen shows something cosmically infinite or one of the electron microscope's alien mosses. In the landscape we can be big or small, we can get lost, stay away and find homes; we can conquer the terrain or disappear in it; destroy or embrace it. Self-body is just one of the horizons we balance on, the one we meet the world with, but also the one we are given who can never know for sure whether the screen shows something cosmically infinite or one of the electron microscope's alien mosses. In the landscape we can be big or small, we can get lost, stay away and find homes; we can conquer the terrain or disappear in it; destroy or embrace it. Self-body is just one of the horizons we balance on, the one we meet the world with, but also the one we are givenoutside. In a kind of osmotic relationship between the flesh of the body and the flesh of the world, we mutually define and penetrate each other. The body is a terrain that can be mapped, but also the yardstick for all other mapping: we experience space because we ourselves are spatial; material because we ourselves are material. In the meeting between two body membranes, In the Flesh reflects on the dualism of the body as permeable and closed, adding in the negative space between them - in the horizon - a desperate staccato of questions to the body as a principle: How big are you in the big? How small are you in the little one? Where are you in the terrain? How do I measure you as a terrain? Who are you cast by, who do you owe your form to? Who sets your boundaries? Where do you stop and when do I start?

Viktoria Wendel Skousen's series of mountain valley plain hearts are four compositions consisting of photography, drawing and woodcuts. The four compositions each explore the place that many writers, and also the late Danish visual artist JF Willumsen, have been so fascinated by over time, namely the legendary Jotunheimen in Norway. The material is accumulated and produced on walks and through a weekday in Jotunheimen, where Wendel Skousen has lived and worked for extended periods over the last 3 years . The mountain valley plain heart relates to the mountain as a symbol, the valley where life in the village occurs, the plain which is the barren no man's land and the heart where it all ends.

During the exhibition, Viktoria will read a text that belongs to the work , here is an excerpt:

"I packed a bag, extra shoes, extra thick sweater, my winter coat in my backpack, a two pack lunch with reindeer poached sausage, 2 potato pancakes with nutella, a tomato. I have patches and two bottles of water. It is cloudy and windy. I walk through the small birch forest up, tugging at the weather the first peak is about 1500 meters, reaching over the tree line in twenty minutes. It is autumn and the mountains are glowing rusty red on deep blue almost black rock. The birch is acid yellow. I cross small waterfalls, I walk along the hillside for a while. Coming up to the big fos, it showers deafening and white. Follows the river upwards. It has snowed, clumps of snow have stained the peaks. I'm up, turning away, away from the big dark blue mountain lake where the mountain trout is. There is no signal on the mobile phone, no messages can be written no calls can be made. I have to keep the concentration I have to pay attention to where I put my foot, all the time. There is only you to save yourself if something happens. "

The exhibition Terrain thus examines the body's being in the world - among other human bodies, among mountains and animals. It talks about how to discover without wanting to conquer and about how relationships, care and care can act as a survival strategy.

Terrain is the last of three in the fall show series. The three exhibitions are curated by Camilla Reyman and are based on body and sexuality and what it may look like when it is not defined by the traditional 'male gauze'.

Terrain

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