Flat

Flat

On view in the gallery are two sets of large format sculptures, mounted to the walls. The first group pairs Freeman’s “Soft Slide” with Boccato’s “gulface.” In the second group, Freeman’s “Soft Vaseline” and “Soft Hose” are joined by Boccato’s “fossface.” The works in both groups take their forms from familiar domestic objects. Freeman’s sculptures faithfully reproduce a tub of vaseline, a garden hose, and a slide sandal, respectively. Boccato’s works take formal liberties with other household fixtures, exaggerating the shape of a faucet, and abstracting the silhouette of a teacup. Taken together, the presentation assembles a wonky quotidian vision, in which everyday objects are enlarged to humorous, exaggerated scales. The exhibition’s title, “FLAT,” makes reference to this subject matter, borrowing the colloquial British term for an apartment.

Freeman’s work is marked by a deflationary impulse, visible in both her methods of production and her selection of subject matter. Her soft sculptures reproduce and exaggerate items traditionally associated with masculine domestic settings. She drains these objects of their virility in order to reinvest them with humor, replacing rigid geometries with flaccid forms. Juxtaposing a jar of Vaseline, notable for its use as a personal lubricant, alongside an oversized garden hose, Freeman subtly skewers toxic masculinity by letting the air out of its common accessories.

Boccato makes brightly colored sculptures from epoxy, fiberglass, and polyurethane. His process begins by sketching outlines of forms he encounters in the world and blowing them up to human scale. Based on these forms, Boccato makes rough molds out of cardboard and tape, which he lines with plastic tarp. He paints the tarp a solid color and applies layers of fiberglass to the mold, which binds to the paint and registers the wrinkles from the tarp. Removing the mold, Boccato is left with a dimensional, monochromatic shell that appears alternatively heavy and plush. The works on view ape the silhouettes of a leaky faucet and an oversized teacup, in a manner that creeps between abstraction and figuration.

Flat

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