Description

This painting belongs to the series "Closer than you think" on which he worked between 1996 and 2001.

"Standing in front of this recent series by Mick Finch, moving between the various paintings, we are immediately confronted-we also find ourselves increasingly faced-by two seemingly irreconcilable histories of painting, exposed to two apparently distinct practices from painting's past-Abstraction and Pop-now wrested together into the same work. The series, in other words, is situated as the present outcome of its own critical and historical dependency, as if the very "subject" of the paintings is also a recognition and acknowledgment of their own divided sources and preconditions. In this sense, the paintings appear to stand before us as if inscribed by the narrative of their own coming into being, their own physical and conceptual process, their own manner, as it were, of working through. And their "mood" is perhaps less one of self-justification, assertion and conviction than the now inevitable ways in which the work assumes for itself-recognizes, displays and demonstrates-the measure of its own contingency." ( Extract from the text "In the Image of painting" from Philip Armstrong for the catalogue "MICK FINCH Closer than you think")

Mick Finch

Closer than you think

  • Medium
    Painting
  • Year
    1997
  • Size

    63.8 × 44.9 × 1.2 in

    162 × 114 × 3 cm

  • Material
    Oil on canvas
  • Price
    € 4,900
  • Edition
    This is a unique work

Description

This painting belongs to the series "Closer than you think" on which he worked between 1996 and 2001.

"Standing in front of this recent series by Mick Finch, moving between the various paintings, we are immediately confronted-we also find ourselves increasingly faced-by two seemingly irreconcilable histories of painting, exposed to two apparently distinct practices from painting's past-Abstraction and Pop-now wrested together into the same work. The series, in other words, is situated as the present outcome of its own critical and historical dependency, as if the very "subject" of the paintings is also a recognition and acknowledgment of their own divided sources and preconditions. In this sense, the paintings appear to stand before us as if inscribed by the narrative of their own coming into being, their own physical and conceptual process, their own manner, as it were, of working through. And their "mood" is perhaps less one of self-justification, assertion and conviction than the now inevitable ways in which the work assumes for itself-recognizes, displays and demonstrates-the measure of its own contingency." ( Extract from the text "In the Image of painting" from Philip Armstrong for the catalogue "MICK FINCH Closer than you think")

Mick Finch

  • Related Artworks