Pedro García-Ramos

1942 · Spain

Artist biography

Pedro García-Ramos is regarded as a well established artist, who originates from Spain, like other renowned artists such as Israel Arino, Carmen Pastrana, Carlos Martín, Carmen Baena, and Belén Rodríguez. Pedro García-Ramos was born in 1942.

Pedro García-Ramos' Gallery representation

Pedro García-Ramos' work is on display at Galería José de la Mano located in Madrid, Spain.

Historical Context of Spain

Spain has played a crucial role in the maturation of art in the twentieth century. In the early 1900s, a young Pablo Picasso developed a uniquely expressive approach to figuration in the post-Impressionist era, firstly with his Blue then Rose periods, although he was to settle in Paris in 1904. Picasso was also the key founding member of the Cubist movement, a group in which he was joined by fellow Spaniard Juan Gris. Both Salvador Dali and Joan Miro were prominent figures in the Surrealist movement, though they were also domiciled in France for large parts of their careers. Throughout the twentieth century the political and cultural landscape of Spain was ruled by the totalitarian autocracy of General Franco whose dictatorship ruled the country, in one form or another, from 1939 until 1975, at which time the monarchy was restored to Juan-Carlos I who subsequently implemented considerable reform. The Franco regime was noted for its brutal anti-communist stance, and the departure of leading intellectual and cultural figures that elected not to live under an oppressive regime. The cultural life of the avant-garde suffered significantly, since liberal artistic movements are often known for their leftist leanings. Key modern and contemporary Spanish artists include Antoni Tapíes, Eduardo Chillida, Eduardo Arroyo, and Manolo Valdes.

Further Biographical Context for Pedro García-Ramos

Born in 1942, Pedro García-Ramos was predominantly inspired by the 1960s. Art turned into a vehicle for dogmas and other agendas, with Pop and Minimalism appearing concurrently as the most defining art movements of the decade. Pop Art in New York city embraced the culture of mass media and mass consumerism, with Artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Tom Wesselmann getting inspired by television, comic strips, billboards and other products of the rise of Capitalism for their artworks. On the other side of the country, the West Coast in California, the first features of what would be known as Conceptual art were blossoming. Minimalism developed the crucial idea that art should exist in its own reality, and not try to represent the physical world. Born of a desire to eradicate all pre-established conceptions about art, Minimalism turned into a radically progressive movement, highly influential worldwide, with artists such as Frank Stella, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin as key actors. Minimalism became influential through the works of artists such as Victor Vasarely and Bridget Riley, while Pop art was a fundamental by-product of the latter, at the same time critiquing and glorifying popular culture. The iconic contemporary art movements that reverberated through the wave of radicalism of the 1960s also had their own distinctions and scopes, distinctive to different areas or countries. Spatialism, for example, was founded in Italy by Lucio Fontana and Piero Manzoni, and its ideologies embraced by the Zero group in Germany. Across Europe, the ideologies of Existentialism strongly influenced artists like Francis Bacon and Alberto Giacometti, who strived to depict the raw human emotions often associated with reflections on death and the lingering anxiety of the meaninglessness of life.

Pedro García-Ramos

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