Ingrid Wiener

1942 · Austria

Artist biography

Ingrid Wiener is seen as an established artist, who was born and brought up in Austria, like other prominent artists such as Stefan Reiterer, Manuel Abendroth, Nickoberthaler, Ulrike Müller, and Constain Luser. Ingrid Wiener was born in 1942.

Galleries and Exhibitions

Ingrid Wiener is represented by two galleries. These are Charim Galerie in Vienna, Austria and Barbara Wien in Berlin, Germany. Ingrid Wiener most recent exhibition recorded on Artland was at Charim Galerie in Vienna with the exhibition Vienna Calling | Weihnukka. The exhibition was open from 06 December 2019 until 10 January 2020. Ingrid Wiener's other most recent exhibitions listed on Artland include the exhibitions at; Charim Galerie in Vienna (10 January 2018 - 03 February 2018) with the name Material Traces and Barbara Wien in Berlin (06 September 2019 - 15 November 2019) with the name Solo Exhibition.

Historical Context of Austria

At the start of the 20th century, Austria was among the most pioneering and culturally progressive countries. It fostered key developments in the Arts and Crafts Movement and Art Nouveau, called Jugendstil in German, from around 1895 to 1910, forming a key bridge between the nineteenth century and the commencement of modernism. This kind of progressive, avant-garde thinking led directly into the Viennese Secession movement, one of the key art and design movements of the early twentieth century. It was founded in 1897 by a group of Austrian painters, graphic artists, sculptors and architects, including Josef Hoffman Koloman Moser, Otto Wagner, and Gustave Klimt, when artists resigned, en masse, from the Association of Austrian Artists in protest against its support for more traditional artistic styles. and an exchange of ideas with international artists, disputing artistic nationalism, renewing the decorative arts and, most crucially, creating a "total art (Gesamtkunstwerk)" that unified painting, architecture, and the decorative arts. The group was fervently opposed to the domination of the official Vienna Academy of the Arts (the Vienna Künstlerhaus), and official art salons, with their traditional orientation toward Historicism. Ultimately the group broke apart, the decorative artists choosing instead to focus on a new guild called the Wiener Werkstatte. In the late 1930s, Austria was annexed by the rising force of Hitler's Nazi Germany, an act known as the Anschluss, and which organised Austria into a province of a greater German Reich. During this period, like in Germany, the Avant-garde was labelled 'Entartete Kunst', translating to 'degenerate art', and was oppressed with only 'official' social realist art being approved, or even allowed by the state. Consequently, there was a great exodus of creative talent who decided that their interests would be best served by relocating to London or New York. In the 20th century, central Austrian artists included Josef Hoffman, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Herbert Bayer (the typography and graphic design pioneer of the Bauhaus), architect and designer Josef Frank, Oskar Kokoschka, Alfred Kubin, Friedensreich Hundertwasser, Maria Lassnig, Hermann Nitsch, Arnulf Rainer, Franz West and Erwin Wurm.

Further Biographical Context for Ingrid Wiener

Born in 1942, Ingrid Wiener's creative work was largely influenced by the 1960s. Historically established in the context of the Cold War, the 1960s epitomize an extremely powerful era which engendered an important number of disruptions and challenged the order of all things. In Europe, The Iron Curtain and the Berlin wall would eternally mark people and beliefs, while in the U.S, events such as the Cuban missile crisis and Vietnam war would forever influence generations to come. From education to gender issues and ideologies, a re-definition of social standards in Western society developed, with ground-breaking philosophies and movements evolving in a cradle of inventiveness. Simplicity and an void of emotions were key concepts in the highly influential movement of Minimalism, represented by artists such as Frank Stella, Donald Judd and Agnes Martin. Bored of the gestural elements of Abstract Expressionism, Minimalist artists focused on delivering artworks mainly gathering polished, clean lines and geometrical elements. Delving further into some of the ideas inherent to Abstract Expressionism, artists like Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler practiced Colour Field Painting – strongly relating to Minimalism, with a fundamentally ruled-based approach, devoid of any emotional aspect. Several schools of philosophy deeply influenced creatives, Francis Bacon and Alberto Giacometti were artists heavily seduced by the ideologies of Existentialism, who achieved worldwide success through their depiction of the human form and the lament often linked to the human condition. globally, an important number of art movements resonated with the radical changes of the 1960s, often prone to their own regional distinctions. In Italy, Lucio Fontana and Piero Manzoni initiated Spatialism, while in Germany, the Zero group adopted similar ideas under the leadership of Günther Uecker.

Ingrid Wiener

  • Exhibitions 3

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