Claudio Moser

1959 · Switzerland

Artist biography

Claudio Moser is regarded as a well established artist, who originates from Switzerland, like other famous artists such as Jasmine Rossi, Pascal Berthoud, Glaser/Kunz, Gina Fischli, and Miriam Cahn. Claudio Moser was born in 1959.

Galleries and Exhibitions

Two galleries around the world represent and exhibit Claudio Moser's work, which are Nicolas Krupp in Basel, Switzerland and Galerie Anke Schmidt in Cologne, Germany. Claudio Moser's work has most recently been exhibited at Galerie Anke Schmidt in Cologne (10 April 2019 until 13 April 2019) with the exhibition Art Cologne 2019.

Historical Context of Switzerland

Perhaps the most important Swiss contribution to the history of Modernism was the establishment of the Dada movement in Zurich in 1916. Its initial members included Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara, Jean Arp and Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Emmy Hennings, and Marcel Janco. Their headquarters, the Cabaret Voltaire, quickly became an vital centre of the artistic and intellectual avant-garde, with the political neutrality Switzerland being a haven from political instability elsewhere in Europe. Beforehand, Switzerland had produced some quirky and extraordinary artists in the Post-Impressionist period of the early twentieth century, including Ferdinand Hodler and Felix Vallotton. Another essential movement that can be attributed to a Swiss artist was the ‘International Style’ of modernist architecture, pioneered by Le Corbusier. Le Corbusier may have become a French citizen in 1930, but he was born Charles-Édouard Jeanneret in the Neuchâtel canton of Switzerland in 1887. Indeed, his first autonomous projects were executed in his hometown of La Chaux-de-Fonds, including proto modern domestic villas for wealthy local clients. Remarkable Swiss artists of the twentieth century include Jean Tingely, Alberto Giacometti, John Armleder, Pipilotti Rist and Thomas Hirschhorn.

Further Biographical Context for Claudio Moser

Born in 1959, Claudio Moser was primarily inspired by the 1970s. The art sphere of the 1970s was characterized by a longing to evolve and reinforce itself, as a response to the many conflicts of the previous decade. One of the most important movement of the 1970s was Conceptualism, which emerged as an offshoot of Minimalism, while the experimental, creative voyage of Process art emerged by combining essential features of Conceptualism with further considerations on art itself. The initial ideas of environmentalism sprung from Land Art, which took art into earth itself, sculpting the land and bringing art to the outdoors. For the first time since the regression of Abstract Expressionism, Expressive figure painting slowly resurfaced and regained its status, especially in Germany through the works of world renowned figures Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer and Georg Baselitz. The city of New York persisted as the most prominent artistic hub of the decade, with international artists wandering through the downtown scene, visiting bars and art galleries, consolidating the idea of New York City as a cosmopolitan and sophisticated cultural capital. Towards the end of the 1970s, street art, evolving from graffiti, was starting to truly fascinate the fine art community. Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat helped legitimize spray painting and tagging, demonstrating that their artworks could exist at the same time in art galleries and on city walls. Following, the global extent of street art would become extremely significant, representing an astonishing form of artistic expression.

Claudio Moser