Anna Muskardin

1958 · Italy

Artist biography

Anna Muskardin is an established contemporary artist, who was born and brought up in Italy, like other celebrated artists such as Alfonso Borghi, Adriano Annino, Pace Marco, Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli, and Frederico Solmi. Anna Muskardin was born in 1958.

Anna Muskardin's Gallery representation

Anna Muskardin is represented by Giorgio Persano Torino located in Turin, Italy.

Historical Context of Italy

Italy has been vastly rich in cultural influence since the time of the Romans, this classical period has exerted a major influence on the cultural growth and distinctiveness of the country. Italy also embodies the country of the Renaissance, called 'Rinascita' in Italian, translating to 'rebirth'. The Renaissance has been considered, from the early 1400s, as the first extensive blossoming of cultural erudition in art, architecture, music, poetry, philosophy and politics since the Middle Ages. Throughout the modern and contemporary period, Italy was afflicted by the fascism of Mussolini but has nevertheless remained as an important centre for artistic expression, spawning movements such as Futurism, Arte Povera and the Minimalism related to the Zero Movement, as well as the expressive painting of the Transavanguardia. Critically acclaimed Italian artists of the twentieth and twenty first centuries include Giorgio Di Chirico, Giacomo Balla, Giorgio Morandi, Alberto Giacometti, Lucio Fontana, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Francesco Clemente and Mimmo Paladino.

Further Biographical Context for Anna Muskardin

Born in 1958, Anna Muskardin was largely inspired by the 1970s growing up. The 1970s were a period of consolidation and development in the arts, most often characterised as a response to the central tensions of the previous decade. Conceptual art developed as a key movement, a partial evolution of and response to minimalism. Land Art took the artwork into the extensive outdoors, taking creative production away from commodities and engaging with the earliest ideas of environmentalism. Process art combined elements of conceptualism with other formal reflections, creating cryptic and experimental bodies of work. Expressive figurative painting began to regain importance for the first time since the decline of Abstract Expressionism twenty years before, especially in Germany where Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer, Georg Baselitz became highly influential figures worldwide. A number of the artists who gained fame and successful in the 1960s remained leading figures. For example, Andy Warhol branched out into film and magazine publishing, the first kind of pan cultural activity for a visual artist. This secured his reputation as a globally renowned celebrity in his own right. Towards the end of the decade, the emerging practices of graffiti and street art were beginning to gain attention in the fine art community. Artists such as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat were working in downtown Manhattan and guaranteeing that spray paint and tagging gained some acceptability as a fine art practice, a trend which would fully develop and dominate during the following decade.