The Market for Prints Is Poised to Thrive as Collecting Online Becomes Ubiquitous
The Market for Prints Is Poised to Thrive as Collecting Online Becomes Ubiquitous
For many members of the print community, the best way to make sure a collector gets bitten by the “print buying bug” is to show them the printmaking process—either via video or, before COVID-19, firsthand.
Artsy
How Three Art Collectors Have Adapted Their Habits during Quarantine
How Three Art Collectors Have Adapted Their Habits during Quarantine
“I’ve realized a few things during this time,” said Brussels-based collector Alain Servais. His biggest takeaway? “Art is not made to be seen online—except,” he clarified, “for the art that is designed to be seen online.”
Artsy
Berlin’s Most Famous Bouncer on His Day Job as a Photographer and What It’s Like to Be a Symbol of a Vanishing Club Scene
Berlin’s Most Famous Bouncer on His Day Job as a Photographer and What It’s Like to Be a Symbol of a Vanishing Club Scene
Sven Marquardt talks about creative life under lockdown and the city's ever-fluctuating club culture.
Artnet
Wet Paint: Leonardo DiCaprio Flips a Work That Was Dedicated to Him, Hans-Ulrich Obrist Interviews Animals on TikTok, & More Juicy Art-World Gossip
Wet Paint: Leonardo DiCaprio Flips a Work That Was Dedicated to Him, Hans-Ulrich Obrist Interviews Animals on TikTok, & More Juicy Art-World Gossip
Which mega-rockstar might get a show at Gagosian? Which collector donated $1,000 to save a Williamsburg bookstore? Read on for answers.
Artnet
PARIS ANNOUNCES $16.5 MILLION RELIEF FUND FOR CULTURE
PARIS ANNOUNCES $16.5 MILLION RELIEF FUND FOR CULTURE
Christophe Girard, Paris’s deputy mayor for culture, has pledged a $16.5 million relief plan for the city’s cultural sector, reports Le Parisien. The bailout includes $12.5 million for the city’s public theaters, art and cultural centers, and concert halls, as well as $1.3 million for private orchestra and concert halls and live show venues. A $54,500 fund is allocated for playwrights and composers. The cinema sector is also receiving support, with a $1.5 million grant, including $327,000 for independent cinemas and $109,000 for the creation of short films. “It's more than a boost,” said Girard. “It is a historic gesture at a time of unusual crisis for Paris to recall that it is the capital of cultural exception.”
Art Forum
Skepticism As A New Attitude Post-Virus
Skepticism As A New Attitude Post-Virus
Skepticism means living with uncertainty, but within this lies the opportunity to revaluate. Read Sylvain Levy's latest dslcollection article.
Artland Magazine
Lost Art. A History Of Unfortunate Accidents
Lost Art. A History Of Unfortunate Accidents
Throughout the centuries lost art works have been exposed to a series of misfortunes that have seen their final end as mere anecdotes.
Artland Magazine
Modes Of Display: The Changing Face Of The Exhibition Format
Modes Of Display: The Changing Face Of The Exhibition Format
Historical exhibitions that challenged aesthetic ideology and marked the beginnings of art movements in the rich history of the modern period.
Artland Magazine
Coronavirus Street Art: How the Pandemic is Changing Our Cities
Coronavirus Street Art: How the Pandemic is Changing Our Cities
An overview of the most powerful and eye-catching Coronavirus-inspired street art examples across the globe.
Artland Magazine
The Pérez Art Museum Miami Is Closed, But It Still Went on a Buying Spree at Local Miami Art Galleries
The Pérez Art Museum Miami Is Closed, But It Still Went on a Buying Spree at Local Miami Art Galleries
The Pérez Art Museum Miami has just purchased eight artworks from local galleries for the museum’s collection, beefing up its holdings of rising stars while offering a much-needed influx of cash to shuttered galleries and the artists they represent.
Artnet
How will museums bring us close to art in a socially distanced era?
How will museums bring us close to art in a socially distanced era?
The rapid succession of museum closures between January and March is still a recent event but, as major museums in Asia and mainland Europe start to tentatively reopen their doors, we are now getting early glimpses of the ‘new normal’. In the UK, museums can reopen no earlier than July, in the third phase of the government’s exit plan. Museums in the United States must adhere to the policy of their state and, while many are actively preparing to reopen, few can yet confirm when. The Art Institute of Chicago, for example, hopes to reopen on 1 July, while the Pérez Art Museum Miami, conscious of the quality of experience it will be able to offer, is aiming for 1 September. Museums further ahead of the game are in touch with their international colleagues, tweaking local guidelines to suit their specific requirements. The institutions forced to wait, and keen museum-goers, are looking on apprehensively to gauge their success.
Apollo Magazine
The Collection of Cable-Television Impresario Ginny Williams, Full of Top-Notch Works by Women, Could Fetch $50 Million at Sotheby’s
The Collection of Cable-Television Impresario Ginny Williams, Full of Top-Notch Works by Women, Could Fetch $50 Million at Sotheby’s
Some of the most anticipated collections heading to market, such as the Macklowe Collection, are on hold amid the lockdown. But Sotheby’s has managed to secure another high-profile get: the collection of the late Ginny Williams, a highly respected Denver philanthropist who made a fortune in the cable television industry with her husband, Carl Williams.
Artnet
Strong sales as France restarts live auctions
Strong sales as France restarts live auctions
Parisian auction houses have reopened with restricted visitor numbers and heightened sanitary measures. Yet, despite these conditions, response from clients has been generous if the results of Artcurial's first post-lockdown sale are anything to go by.
The Art Newspaper
Raphael: as great as Leonardo and Michelangelo?
Raphael: as great as Leonardo and Michelangelo?
This episode begins by celebrating good news: that the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition of works by Raphael at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome—which only opened for three days before being closed due to Covid-19 in March—will re-open on 2 June and run for three months until 30 August. The show, which begins with Raphael’s death and moves back in time, is the jewel in the crown of the celebrations across Europe and the US marking the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death. Hugo Chapman, the Keeper of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum and a Raphael specialist, heralds the genius of an artist whose fame has somewhat unfairly been eclipsed by Leonardo and by his great rival Michelangelo.
The Art Newspaper
'Impeach Bolsonaro': artist hangs black cloths on Brazilian Embassy in Paris to protest against president
'Impeach Bolsonaro': artist hangs black cloths on Brazilian Embassy in Paris to protest against president
The Brazilian artist Julio Villani mounted a protest against the right-wing Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro in Paris yesterday. Villani hung six black cloths on the façade of the Brazilian Embassy emblazoned with statements such as “impeach Bolsonaro” and a smaller white banner declared that “another Brazil is possible”.
The Art Newspaper
Art SG cancels inaugural fair—again
Art SG cancels inaugural fair—again
The first edition of the Singapore fair Art SG, due to run from 30 October until 1 November, has been postponed for the second time and will now take place from 5 to 7 November 2021. In a statement released this morning, Art SG's organisers say the decision was made: "In light of the current uncertainty brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, and out of consideration for the health and safety of all involved". It adds the fair, which is led by director Shuyin Yang and co-founder Magnus Renfrew, will "continue to work with partners on a number of physical and digital activations", though no further details are given as yet.
The Art Newspaper
Emma Amos, Imaginative Painter Who Attacked Racism Through Figuration, Is Dead at 83
Emma Amos, Imaginative Painter Who Attacked Racism Through Figuration, Is Dead at 83
Emma Amos, a figurative painter whose visually seductive art stared down racism and privilege, has died at 83. Her gallery, Ryan Lee, said in an email announcement that Amos died in Bedford, New Hampshire, on May 20 of Alzheimer’s disease.
Art News
Understanding Why Nobody Made Great Art About the Previous World-Shaking Pandemic + Two Other Illuminating Reads From Around the Web
Understanding Why Nobody Made Great Art About the Previous World-Shaking Pandemic + Two Other Illuminating Reads From Around the Web
Each week, countless articles, think pieces, columns, op-eds, features, and manifestos are published online—and not a few of them cast new light on the world of art. To help sift through this barrage of content, I pick out a few each week that might inspire some larger discussion.
Artnet
Curator Karen Kramer Picks Five Artists to Watch From Indian Market
Curator Karen Kramer Picks Five Artists to Watch From Indian Market
In this ongoing series, curators and members of the Native arts community share five artists they were looking forward to seeing at the 2020 Indian Market, which has been postponed to 2021. For this series, we asked curators and members of the Native arts community to spotlight five artists whose work they were looking forward to seeing at the 2020 Indian Market, with the hope that this can play a small part in making up for some of the exposure lost from the postponement of this year’s market. Our goal is to highlight Native artists who have continued to make important work amid these trying times.
Hyperallergic
13% of Museums Worldwide May Close Permanently Due to COVID-19, Studies Say
13% of Museums Worldwide May Close Permanently Due to COVID-19, Studies Say
Nearly 13% of museums worldwide may never reopen after the COVID-19 shutdown, according to new research by UNESCO and the International Council of Museums (ICOM). The two studies were released jointly on the occasion of the International Museum Day on Monday, May 18, which was celebrated online due to the pandemic.
Hyperallergic
Five of the best places to buy art for a good cause right now
Five of the best places to buy art for a good cause right now
As lockdown extends from weeks into months, the stream of charitable initiatives to help those adversely affected by the coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis continues. More and more artists and galleries are joining forces either to offer individual artworks or mount online exhibitions to benefit a range of good causes connected with the impact of the coronavirus. A pandemic may seem like a strange time to begin collecting art but if a purchase delivers the double whammy of making a charitable donation and owning a great work, then why not?
The Art Newspaper
UK government appoints commissioner to get culture sector 'back up and running'
UK government appoints commissioner to get culture sector 'back up and running'
Neil Mendoza has today been appointed the UK government’s Commissioner for Cultural Recovery and Renewal. He will be responsible for providing the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) with “an expert and independent voice” to deal with the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on the arts.
The Art Newspaper
Here is a lineup of museums in the US and Europe that have announced plans to reopen
Here is a lineup of museums in the US and Europe that have announced plans to reopen
Following the lead of museums in Asia and Europe, a growing number of art institutions are announcing plans to reopen after prolonged shutdowns in response to the coronavirus. Most of the museums have adopted safety procedures like requiring or encouraging visitors to wear masks, selling timed tickets, mandating social distancing and installing hand sanitising stations. As institutions continue to confirm their plans to welcome the public into their buildings, we will update this list with more opening dates. In-depth coverage on how the art world is starting to emerge from the pandemic can be found here.
The Art Newspaper
Climate change is the next big crisis
Climate change is the next big crisis
It is perhaps fitting that the 50th anniversary of Earth Day in April came at a moment of acute awareness of our own fragility as a species. It has been a solemn yet precious time for introspection, as spring unfolds dramatically around us. The coronavirus has brought some silver linings: among them, cities around the world have seen improvements in air quality and for some, the first blue skies in years.
The Art Newspaper
10 Good Things That Happened In The Art World This Week
10 Good Things That Happened In The Art World This Week
Hey art squad, how are you doing? We know times are tough right now but we’re here to make things better. The world may be changing but we’re here to get you through by spreading #goodvibes only. So, to make you feel good about life, here’s 10 good things that happened in the art world this week!
The Art Gorgeous
A High-Tech Investigation Has Finally Figured Out the Brilliant Trick Renaissance Architects Used to Make Their Domed Churches
A High-Tech Investigation Has Finally Figured Out the Brilliant Trick Renaissance Architects Used to Make Their Domed Churches
The domed churches of Italy have long stood as an emblem of the Renaissance, inspiring many a pilgrimage for engineers, architects, and anyone who loves beautiful things. But for generations, the science behind these domes baffled experts.
Artnet
Online Viewing Rooms Are Creating a Goldmine of User Data on Art Collectors. Here’s How Galleries Are Using It—and How They Could in the Future
Online Viewing Rooms Are Creating a Goldmine of User Data on Art Collectors. Here’s How Galleries Are Using It—and How They Could in the Future
Since the art world’s widespread physical shutdown triggered a flood of online viewing rooms, much of the industry’s attention has been directed toward typical sales reports and heartening progress on price transparency. At this point, we can safely say two things: that business is still being done in the depths of the crisis; and that the average observer has never before had more visibility into the availability of artworks and their costs. These are inherently good things.
Artnet
Why the Contemporary African Art Market Is Uniquely Positioned to Weather COVID-19
Why the Contemporary African Art Market Is Uniquely Positioned to Weather COVID-19
The market for modern and contemporary African art has steadily grown for the last few years. The success of the 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair—whose latest, online-only edition opened earlier this month—and a steady increase of prices reached at auction has felt long overdue. Heading into 2020, 90 percent of dealers in Africa said they expected sales to increase this year, according to Clare McAndrew’s report “The Art Market 2020.” Now, the global pandemic may be threatening that optimism and momentum.
Artsy
Rachel Ruysch’s Exquisite Still Lifes Revolutionized the Form
Rachel Ruysch’s Exquisite Still Lifes Revolutionized the Form
When Dolly Parton’s now-famous meme “Get you a woman who can do it all” hit the internet a few months ago, my nerdy, art history–saturated brain drifted to the 17th-century Dutch painter Rachel Ruysch. Recently, I’d become fascinated with Ruysch’s accomplishments and before-her-time mediation of career and family. She revolutionized still lifes, sold her canvases for more money than Rembrandt did, and contributed to influential scientific developments—all while raising 10 children. And that just scratches the surface of her story.
Artsy
How Three Art Collectors Have Adapted Their Habits during Quarantine
How Three Art Collectors Have Adapted Their Habits during Quarantine
Typically around this time of year, the New York City art market would be alight following the May auctions at Christie’s, Sotheby’s, and Phillips, which come right after the dash to Randall’s Island for Frieze New York and uptown to TEFAF New York. But of course, 2020 is far from a typical year. This spring, collectors have had to switch out their VIP passes for online log-in credentials as the art market has gone completely digital due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Artsy
Auction Breakout Star Amoako Boafo Portrait Takes the Lead at Phillips
Auction Breakout Star Amoako Boafo Portrait Takes the Lead at Phillips
In February, Phillips unveiled a painting by Ghanian-born, Vienna-based painter Amoako Boafo in their London Contemporary art Evening sale marking the first time a canvas by the coveted primary market artist would surface at auction. The work achieved a total of £675,000 (US $881,550), far surpassing the pre-sale estimate of £30,000-£50,000 (US $38,700-$64,500). Now, Phillips has another work by Boafo, the second to come to market to date, in a themed online contemporary sale of just 24 lots called Shaping the Surface.
Art Market Monitor
Phillips Unveils $9.5M.-$12.5M. Joan Mitchell for Evening Auction, Revealing New Date in July
Phillips Unveils $9.5M.-$12.5M. Joan Mitchell for Evening Auction, Revealing New Date in July
Has Christmas come early for Phillips? That might be the case when the auction house offers up a Joan Mitchell painting titled Noël (1961–62) at its rescheduled 20th Century and Contemporary Art Evening Sale, which has moved from the end of June and is now slated to take place on July 2. The work is expected to sell for $9.5–$12.5 million.
Art Market Monitor
Sculptor Ron Mueck Departs Mega-Gallery Hauser & Wirth, Joins Thaddaeus Ropac
Sculptor Ron Mueck Departs Mega-Gallery Hauser & Wirth, Joins Thaddaeus Ropac
After nearly a decade at one of the world’s biggest galleries, the Australian sculptor Ron Mueck is departing for new representation. Mueck and Hauser & Wirth gallery have parted ways, and is now joining the roster of Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, which has locations in London, Paris, and Salzburg. In October, Mueck will have a solo exhibition of work in the gallery’s London space hosted in collaboration with British dealer Anthony d’Offay, who worked with the artist before his gallery closed.
Art News
Anthony Hopkins Steps Out of the Shadows as an Artist
Anthony Hopkins Steps Out of the Shadows as an Artist
Last week, Anthony Hopkins, the award-winning actor best known for portraying Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs and more recently for his role in Westworld, became an internet sensation when he posted a TikTok of himself dancing to Drake’s hit song “Toosie Slide.” Behind him loomed a large painting showing the outline of a face against a semi-abstracted background of bright colors. At first glance, the painting might look like a work by Francis Picabia from the artist’s famed “Transparencies” series. In fact, the work is by Hopkins himself—though Picabia is among his influences.
Art News
Venice Biennale Curator Cecilia Alemani Doesn’t Want to Do a ‘Coronavirus Biennial’
Venice Biennale Curator Cecilia Alemani Doesn’t Want to Do a ‘Coronavirus Biennial’
The long list of biennials and other exhibitions of the kind delayed by the pandemic continues to grow—with the biggest of them all, the Venice Biennale, recently joining the ranks of Front International in Cleveland, Prospect New Orleans, the Bienal de São Paulo, Dak’Art Biennale in Senegal, Riga International Biennial in Latvia, Liverpool Biennial, Berlin Biennale, Manifesta in Marseille, and the Gwangju Biennale in South Korea. On Monday, organizers in Venice announced plans to push the scheduled 2021 Venice Biennale instead to 2022 (along with additional plans to move the Venice Architecture Biennale, originally planned for this month, to next year).
Art News