William Grob

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William Grob

William Grob’s as child had severe speech disorders and wasn’t able to express himself verbally until the age of seven. He recurred to colors and forms to express his emotions and feelings and this is still deeply rooted in his practice, making the line between reality and psychic world another main theme of his artistic practice. His series MASKS based on street photographs he shot in New York City and Berlin, offers poignant mediations on life, society and individual experience, soaked with a polemic irony, a combination of factors that could bring us in mind the collage works of Angus Fairhurst, while his use of rough pencil strokes, and the drawing of the simplified, ungendered human figure brings him closer to the precursor of street art Keith Harrings in his efforts to immortalize the living pulsing energy of our cities. The choice of stretching and extremising the proportions of his ungendered figures just enough, while being immortalized acting in a debatable society, together with the choice of focusing on the outcasts, homeless, drunks, and the subtle loneliness perceived his work, reminds instead of the first works of George Grosz, with the slightly softened perspective of a young men that even if able to see the contradictions of our society and times, never lived the historical horrors of the first forty five years of the XX century. Grob’s bigger works from the series OVERLAID EMOTIONS are the result of painting interventions, driven by pure emotion, on reproductions of vintage photographs. Photography is dinostest as much as honest in the reproduction of reality, and by letting his emotions flow over them through color, either in a controlled way either in an impulsive one, Grob point his finger to the paradox that we live in a world which holds no truths and no answers, only beliefs. His belief is in showing at the same time a physical truth, the photographs, and an emotive honesty, the paintings. The use of apparently absurd and out of contest text in his work is also a way to represent the truth unfiltered by binary oppositions, as the permanent mumbling of our brain that can process simultaneously the most complex reasoning and the most banal thought, making us able to add to the dichotomy black/white not only grey, but also the whole range of colors and shades.

William Grob

  • Luisa Catucci Gallery's Exhibitions 35