Lidó Rico

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Lidó Rico

Lidó Rico’s figures maintain this combat in another way, as the material that grips them is much more perceptible, although none the less mortifying: the wall. Even the marked contrast between the smoothness of the support and the rhetorical complexity of the shapes that protrude from it: intricate in their gesticulations, audacious in their chromatic explosion, threatening in their shrieks, transmit a feeling of impotence with a force as consistent as that of Michelangelo’s slaves. Lidó Rico’s figures are not the result of a liberation of the material, but their adherence to the wall, the fact that they are high reliefs, establishes a virtual trial of strength with it. With respect to the other element, pain, Michelangelo considered it to be the fulcrum of the creative experience, as the element that redeems the material of its condition and converts it into sculptural material. The artist himself redeems himself in said process. For Lidó Rico, pain also has a physical aspect by converting the process of creation of the work into a true performance. Smearing himself all over again and again to obtain the different moulds required to make his sculptures, the artist transmits, gives shape to his physical feelings that in their final elaboration become incarnations of spiritual uneasiness. His figures, always fragmented, show the tearing apart that besets them internally. Faced with the example of emotional unease shown through gesticulations, Lidó Rico prefers to focus his lament on the faces that become expression’s nuclear space. The face. Here we have the corporeal space that shows the feelings of the subject most honestly. This is why, when painting abandons its immature mediaeval stage, the face begins to become relevant. It is no accident that the great Giotto was the first to raise its role to a level hitherto unknown. The distorted gestures of Lidó Rico’s figures submerge us in the pain of contemporary man; physical pain as the support of spiritual pain, facial deformation as a spontaneous sign of uncontrolled internal impulses. If Charles Le Brun, the artist and theoretician of the French Baroque period, in consonance with his academic mentality, elaborated an array of physiognomic types to express different states of mind, Lidó Rico prefers spontaneity. It is during these operations to make the moulds that the physiognomies are built, almost always in torment. In this way physical pain gives a formal channel to internal pain. The end result of his effort is manifested in corporeal fragments, residues of the same fixed by using synthetic resins. Faces, heads, extremities; the broken body that cannot ever be stitched together, beyond the feeling of physical pain itself, corporeal disarticulation is a reflection of internal agony.

Lidó Rico

  • Luisa Catucci Gallery's Exhibitions 35