I Will Be Dead

I Will Be Dead

The work “Maze” by Michael Sailstorfer shows a labyrinth, in which a trace is marked with the swift, gestural stroke of a spray can. It depicts the fundamental themes of being alive as an individual: The labyrinth in its baroque interpretation as a maze, in which one is to lose one’s seeking self or to have the experience of a loss of bearings, of “a-mazement”, as a symbol of the world or of life. The two-dimensional presentation gives the artist an overview – as to where he stands, which pathway he is taking, where he is in error, and whether he will reach his goal.

Questions of one’s way of life, with all its uncertainties and erroneous ways, is also posed by Jeppe Hein in his work. The viewer looks into his own mirror image, which is superimposed by these questions asked in neon letters - who am I, where am I, where do I come from? Is my origin and identity relevant to the path I can take? How can I orient myself, what will stop me? During the childhood years, it is undoubtedly one’s own family that sets the standards. It can be as idyllic as in Norbert Bisky’s “Dschungelcamp”, framed and set up as in Andreas Mühe’s “Portrait einer Hamburger Familie” or abysmal, as in Patrizio di Massimo’s “Rhapsody in the closet”.

Childhood’s insouciance presents a striking duality, whereby the state of play represents a crucial act of discovery and learning. The idea of building as one plays is evoked in Sam Falls’ geometric sculpture. For a child, it is a continuous exercise to decipher the world around us, where everything is new and unknown. The external stimuli and unknown objects can be enchanting, like the bubbles of Jiri Georg Dokoupil, or terrifying, like the vulture that sits down on the edge of the children’s bed by Elmgreen & Dragset. In connection with the saying on the wall, the installation appears like a gloomy prophecy of the future. Both works also speak to the fleetingness and fragility of childhood.

I Will Be Dead

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