Between Worlds

Between Worlds

Admiring Marion Peck's work, one of the leading figures, with her husband Mark Ryden, of Pop Surrealism, is walking around in a dark and whimsical world, a bizarre fairyland where forest animals, grotesque creatures and melancholy children coexist, and which recalls Alice's fantasies in Wonderland. Inspired by Lewis Caroll's novel, Marion Peck is just as much inspired by classical painters in the Western tradition. Her artworks converse with famous paintings from the Renaissance, the 17th or the 18th century. Her technique, perfectly mastered, is also part of the direct heritage of the great Flemish and Italian masters. In a subtle way, with a disconcerting originality, Marion Peck excels in mixing pictorial tradition and modernity. Because her paintings tell us about us, our entertainment society, our cultural industry, our world of appearances. The artist overturns the codes of the marvelous usually associated with the Disney magic to portray visibly fragile characters, worried, uncomfortable in their disproportionate bodies, and who never fail to call to the viewer an emotional response. We end up getting attached, without even paying attention, to these strange beings that populate of Marion Peck imaginary world.

Between Worlds