Anne Cécile Surga

Anne Cécile Surga

Anne Cecile Surga was born in a city of Lavelanetin the Occitanie region in southwestern France. In 2000 she entered her first drawing and painting class. She learnt rules of compositions, anatomy, and harmony of colors along with different techniques such as drawing, pastel, china ink and oil painting. Despite that Anne Cecile enrolled in a business school in 2006 while studying clay sculpture in the evening. She later graduated with a Master in Business Administration, and later with a Master in Art History in 2012 in New York. In 2013 Anne Cecile stayed at the Fundacion Pablo Atchugarry where she learnt how to cut marble. From 2015 she entirely dedicated her life to sculpture and opened her studio in the Pyrenean Mountains in France. She has since shown her work internationally both in group and solo exhibitions and won several prizes for it such as the YICCA Art Prize. The marble is the primary material of Anne Cecile Surga Art, the most classical and most challenging material amy contemporary artist could find. Her minimalist and conceptual approach mixes contemporary art with the classic tradition and the idea of organic to create the raffinate and graceful sculptures. In her works Anne Cecile Surga tries to study how human qualities continue to be true despite the environment and cruelty of the modern world. She manages to create the illusion of softness, suppleness and fragility of the stone. She skillfully mixes artificial with natural, absolute and pure geometric precision of the marble block with soft lines and outlined silhouettes inherent in the natural world. Marble as a material, among all the stones, only marble has some translucency that make its surface comparable to that of human skin. It is also the translucency that gives a marble a visual depth beyond its surface. Marble is relatively soft and easy to work, refine, and polish and with ages, it becomes harder and more durable. The fineness of marble's grain enables the sculptor to render minute detail and create the possibility of a certain realism. Some artists prefer to carve directly onto the stone, without a model; the Renaissance artist Michelangelo, for example, claimed that his job was to free the human form trapped inside the block. Anne Cecile Surga seems not to have any will change the stone from a rough block into the general shape of the finished statue. The sculptor, on the one hand, admires the nature of marble as a solid and natural material, on the other hand, tries to find other qualities, and the stone obeys it. The lines seem to be born from the pieces of marble themselves, like a soul is being born in a stone, as if it were not an idea and hard work of the artist. Her method is a method of hints, subtle allegories, allowing us to see complexity behind apparent simplicity, fragility behind persistence.

Anne Cécile Surga

  • Luisa Catucci Gallery's Exhibitions 35