Description

In Luca Pancrazzi’s works there is a recurring perception of a movement that takes place on this side of the drawn or painted surface: a continuous shift of the gaze, almost always horizontal, at head height, or, more descriptively, at the height of a person seated in a vehicle. Whether it is aerial views of the Engadin Mountains, the hills of Lebanon, Milan’s most famous skylines or peri-urban visions of any city or industrial district, Pancrazzi always infuses into his work the dynamic impression of the one-to-one relationship with which he has observed the environment. The photographic documentation of the urban landscape images, which the artist perceives as constantly changing, runs in parallel to their translation into drawing. In the observer’s digital memory and retina the scenes wrap themselves as if they were part of a single narrative, an inexhaustible journey that spills over onto canvas, paper and other media. In the series of Indian ink works on view the techniques of drawing and painting overflow into each other, and every single work is linked to all the others as if they were frames of a single video shot, made by shooting in a circle. The drawings follow one another like pages in the notebook of a (motorised) flâneur and share the character of scattered notes, glances at the city internalised and returned without the desire to illustrate it. Pancrazzi’s work, in fact, has no documentary intent in its formal results; on the contrary, even in the representation of architecture or easily recognisable scenarios, the experimentation of the medium takes over. The author presents in two-tone, monochrome, the dematerialisation of the canvas and the decomposition of the figuration, sometimes denying the very meaning of the image in order to enhance the poetic dimension of the technique, the gamble in the artist’s vision, and the infinite possibilities of declination of reality through the language of art. In works in pen and ink, especially small-format works, this inclination is articulated through a series of gestures of freedom (with respect to balance, geometry, and initial inspiration) that takes an almost musical trend. The works follow one another as variations on a theme, a sequence of notes that is repeated as it changes and gives a very strong formal unity to each series.

Luca Pancrazzi

164414082020

  • Medium
    Painting
  • Year
    2020
  • Size

    19.7 × 27.6 in

    50 × 70 cm

  • Material
    Sumi Ink on paper, framed
  • Price
    Ask for price
  • Edition
    This is a unique work

Description

In Luca Pancrazzi’s works there is a recurring perception of a movement that takes place on this side of the drawn or painted surface: a continuous shift of the gaze, almost always horizontal, at head height, or, more descriptively, at the height of a person seated in a vehicle. Whether it is aerial views of the Engadin Mountains, the hills of Lebanon, Milan’s most famous skylines or peri-urban visions of any city or industrial district, Pancrazzi always infuses into his work the dynamic impression of the one-to-one relationship with which he has observed the environment. The photographic documentation of the urban landscape images, which the artist perceives as constantly changing, runs in parallel to their translation into drawing. In the observer’s digital memory and retina the scenes wrap themselves as if they were part of a single narrative, an inexhaustible journey that spills over onto canvas, paper and other media. In the series of Indian ink works on view the techniques of drawing and painting overflow into each other, and every single work is linked to all the others as if they were frames of a single video shot, made by shooting in a circle. The drawings follow one another like pages in the notebook of a (motorised) flâneur and share the character of scattered notes, glances at the city internalised and returned without the desire to illustrate it. Pancrazzi’s work, in fact, has no documentary intent in its formal results; on the contrary, even in the representation of architecture or easily recognisable scenarios, the experimentation of the medium takes over. The author presents in two-tone, monochrome, the dematerialisation of the canvas and the decomposition of the figuration, sometimes denying the very meaning of the image in order to enhance the poetic dimension of the technique, the gamble in the artist’s vision, and the infinite possibilities of declination of reality through the language of art. In works in pen and ink, especially small-format works, this inclination is articulated through a series of gestures of freedom (with respect to balance, geometry, and initial inspiration) that takes an almost musical trend. The works follow one another as variations on a theme, a sequence of notes that is repeated as it changes and gives a very strong formal unity to each series.

Luca Pancrazzi

  • MLF | Marie-Laure Fleisch, Brussels's Artworks 122