Description

Bettina Samson’s series of ceramics, Shakers, refers to the so called religious community which persisted until the 20st century. Highly extreme in their conception of utopia, members used to associate their daily tasks to a sacred dimension. During the "Era of Manifestations" (around 1843), they aimed to reach collective trance during ceremonies with the help of convulsive dances, which gave them their denomination. Movements we can observe in the sculptures remind those of dancing bodies, trying to escape consciousness in order to discover new visions. The strange forms of the sculptures, oscillating between coarse and unrestrained gesture, also become a tribute to the "gift drawings" sketched in their quest for divine revelation. The plinths are an appropriation of the Shakers as well. Indeed, their convictions made them develop their own style of furniture which, in recent years, attracted the attention of designers who see it as a prefiguration of current minimalism. Samson used their assembly technique, respecting their desire of simplicity and paying special attention to its utilitarian function.

Bettina Samson

Emily Babcock

  • Medium
    Sculpture
  • Year
    2019
  • Size

    19.7 × 21.3 × 29.9 in

    50 × 54 × 76 cm

  • Material
    Glazed stoneware ceramic
  • Price
    Ask for price
  • Edition
    This is a unique work
  • Certificate of Authenticity
    Includes certificate of authenticity.
  • All purchases are protected by our Buyer Protection. Taxes and shipping may apply.

Description

Bettina Samson’s series of ceramics, Shakers, refers to the so called religious community which persisted until the 20st century. Highly extreme in their conception of utopia, members used to associate their daily tasks to a sacred dimension. During the "Era of Manifestations" (around 1843), they aimed to reach collective trance during ceremonies with the help of convulsive dances, which gave them their denomination. Movements we can observe in the sculptures remind those of dancing bodies, trying to escape consciousness in order to discover new visions. The strange forms of the sculptures, oscillating between coarse and unrestrained gesture, also become a tribute to the "gift drawings" sketched in their quest for divine revelation. The plinths are an appropriation of the Shakers as well. Indeed, their convictions made them develop their own style of furniture which, in recent years, attracted the attention of designers who see it as a prefiguration of current minimalism. Samson used their assembly technique, respecting their desire of simplicity and paying special attention to its utilitarian function.

Bettina Samson

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