Woo jin Kim

1987 · Republic of Korea

Artist biography

Woo jin Kim is considered to be an emerging artist, who originates from the Republic of Korea, like other famous artists such as Chan Hyo Bae, Hae Won Sohn, Ilhwa Kim, Sung-Pil Chae, and Gimhongsok . Woo jin Kim was born in 1987.

About Woo jin Kim's works

Woo jin Kim is giving an innovative contribution in the fields of Pop and Figuration. Pop art was born in the 1950s simultaneously across America and Britain, and reached its peak in the 1960s, in a climate of increased consumerism and cultural revolution. Emerging artists felt like they couldn’t get in touch with the current state of art as it was taught or exhibited in museums, which they deemed too distant from their everyday lives. This led them to turn to popular culture as their main subject matter, horrifying modernist critics. Among a few of the characteristics listed by pop artist Richard Hamilton, Pop Art should aim to be young, glamorous, sexy, witty, low-cost and mass produced. While in the United States pop artists were essentially attempting to move away from the deeply personal symbolism of abstract expressionism, in Britain the movement was more focused on the power of American pop-culture imagery, and its influence on the society.

In essence, figurative art is art which depicts recognizable features of reality, or of the human figure. Although the definition appears to be rather simple, figuration still remains in its very core more than just a depiction of reality. Indeed, the different styles in which figurative art can be executed are infinite, thus making figurative art a ground-breaking and ever evolving category, in which Woo jin Kim's work is mainly grounded. Some critically acclaimed artists known for their impact on figurative art include Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Paul Cézanne or Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Further Biographical Context for Woo jin Kim

Born in 1987, Woo jin Kim's creative work was primarily inspired by the 1990s. In the United Kingdom, a group of artists known as the YBAs, or Young British Artists, dominated the artistic culture of the decade. They were a loosely affiliated and diverse group, connected generally by their age and nationality. Many of the members had attended the Royal College of Art and Goldsmiths in London, and were favoured by Charles Saatchi, the ‘super collector’ of art at the time. The most famous member of the group is arguably Damien Hirst, and other members included Chris Ofili, Tracey Emin, Marc Quinn, Gavin Turk, Sarah Lucas and Sam Taylor-Johnson (née Sam Taylor-Wood). Through their use of shock tactics and sensationalism, the YBAs garnered a controversial reputation image which was further fuelled by their use of throwaway materials, wild lifestyles and an attitude that was at the same time rebellious and entrepreneurial. The group was predominant in the British art scene in the 1990s and their group show ‘Sensation’ is now viewed as legendary.

The boom in consumerism and advertising that took place in the 1980s influenced a trend in Japan that matured into the art form of manga, which was visually inspired by trends in advertising and graphic design. Takashi Murakami arose as a leading figure in the art world, coining the term ‘Superflat’ to describe a theory inspired by the aesthetic characteristics of manga and the nature of post-war Japanese culture. Murakami went on to found the influential Kaikai Kiki collective, which was inspired by his experiences living in New York City in the mid-1990s.

Relational Aesthetics, a term coined by curator Nicholas Bourriaud to describe the act of making art based on human relations and their social context, became a leading idea in the 1990s. Works by artists like Douglas Gordon, Gillian Wearing, Philippe Parenno and Liam Gillick were described as important artists who worked to this agenda.

The art world was influenced by a number of trends throughout the 1990s, the controversial, hyper-realistic sculptures of Maurizio Cattelan and the sensitive, conceptual work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres epitomised the atmosphere of the era.

German artists and ideas strongly influenced trends in conceptual photography during this period. German artists such as Andreas Gursky, Thomas Struth, and Wolfgang Tillmans gained international recognition, and inspired international artists such as the Canadian Jeff Wall, who created images with a cinematic expressiveness that were inspired by the themes represented in the German artists’ work. At the same time, Albert Oehlen and Martin Kippenberger gained influential status in the field of painting.

Woo jin Kim

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