Stanislaw Lewkowicz

1956 · Netherlands

Artist biography

Stanislaw Lewkowicz is regarded as a well established artist, who originates from the Netherlands, like other artists such as Bas Van Wieringen, Loes Koomen, Ksenia Galiaeva, Reinier Lucassen, and Sylvie Zijlmans. Stanislaw Lewkowicz was born in 1956.

Galleries and Exhibitions

Stanislaw Lewkowicz' work is on display at Flatland Gallery located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Stanislaw Lewkowicz most recent exhibition recorded on Artland was at Flatland Gallery in Amsterdam (05 May 2018 until 23 June 2018) with the exhibition Standing in the midst of those trees by the water/ / American War Cemetery.

Historical Context of Netherlands

In the post-Impressionist era, the dutch Vincent Van Gogh is considered among one of the most important innovators, and is of course viewed as one of the most remarkable painters of all time, irrespective of the era. In the twentieth century, some of the earliest examples of abstraction in the Netherlands were emerged under the aegis of the seminal de Stijl movement, led by Piet Mondrian and Theo van Doesberg. Gerrit Rietveld was an influential architect and designer whose work is closely related to the ideas of De Stijl.

Further Biographical Context for Stanislaw Lewkowicz

Stanislaw Lewkowicz was born in 1956 and was predominantly inspired by the 1970s. Conceptualism is often perceived as a response to Minimalism, and the dominant art movement of the 1970s, challenging the boundaries of art with its revolutionary features. The movements that succeeded were all representative of a strong desire to evolve and consolidate the art world, in response to the tensions of the previous 1960s. Process art branched out from Conceptualism, including some of its most essential aspects, but going further in creating mysterious and experimental artistic journeys, while Land Art brought creation to the outdoors, initiating early ideas of environmentalism. In Germany, Expressive figure painting was given a second chance for the first time since the decline of Abstract Expressionism almost two decades, the genre regained its distinction through the brushstrokes of Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer and Georg Baselitz. Most of the critically acclaimed artists from the 1960s, who had gained success and fame, kept their status in the 1970s. Andy Warhol was a key figure of those two decades, and in the 1970s started to experiment with film and magazine publishing, thus engaging in a cross-platform activity that no other visual artist of such standard had previously undertaken. By doing so, he secured his status as a celebrity. The critically engaged Mono-Ha movement, comprised of Japanese and Korean artists, blossomed in Tokyo in the 1970s. Rejecting traditional ideas of representation, the artists favoured a depiction of the world through an engagement with materials and an exploration of their properties. The artworks would often consist of encounters between natural and industrial materials such as stone, glass, cotton, sponge, wood, oil and water, mostly unchanged intact.

Stanislaw Lewkowicz