Rudy Burckhardt

1914 · Switzerland

Artist biography

Rudy Burckhardt is an established contemporary artist, who was born in Switzerland, like other celebrated artists such as Aldo Walker, Willy Wimpfheimer, Bénédict Remund, Linus Bill & Adrien Horni, and Lorenz Spring. Rudy Burckhardt was born in 1914.

Rudy Burckhardt's Gallery representation

Rudy Burckhardt is represented by Tibor De Nagy Gallery in New York, the United States.

Historical Context of Switzerland

Perhaps the most important Swiss contribution to the development of Modernism was the establishment of the Dada movement in Zurich in 1916. Its initial members included Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara, Jean Arp and Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Emmy Hennings, and Marcel Janco. Their headquarters, the Cabaret Voltaire, quickly metamorphosed into an important hub of the artistic and intellectual avant-garde, with the political neutrality Switzerland being a haven from political instability elsewhere in Europe. Prior to that, Switzerland had produced some quirky and extraordinary artists in the Post-Impressionist era of the early twentieth century, including Ferdinand Hodler and Felix Vallotton. Another major movement that can be attributed to a Swiss artist was the ‘International Style’ of modernist architecture, pioneered by Le Corbusier. Le Corbusier might have become a French citizen in 1930, but he was born Charles-Édouard Jeanneret in the Neuchâtel canton of Switzerland in 1887. Indeed, his first autonomous projects were executed in his hometown of La Chaux-de-Fonds, including proto modern domestic villas for affluent local clients. Important Swiss artists of the twentieth century include Jean Tingely, Alberto Giacometti, John Armleder, Pipilotti Rist and Thomas Hirschhorn.

Further Biographical Context for Rudy Burckhardt

Born in 1914, Rudy Burckhardt's creative work was primarily influenced by the 1930s. The period of the 1930s is characterised by the clashing of many political ideologies, including Marxist Socialism, Capitalist Democracy, and the Totalitarianism of both Communism and Fascism. In the Soviet Union, Stalin’s government needed urgent funds to implement the rapid industrialisation demanded by the first Five Year Plan. It initiated a secret plan to sell off treasures from the State Hermitage Museum in Leningrad (St. Petersburg), including a primary list of two hundred and fifty unique paintings by the Old Masters, a number of which found their way to the collection of Andrew Mellon via the New York based art dealing company, Knoedler.

Rudy Burckhardt