Luciano Bartolini

1948 - 1994 · Italy

Artist biography

Luciano Bartolini was a creative artist, who originated from Italy, like other famous artists such as Ernesto Treccani, Matteo Messori, Paolo Roversi, Carlo Rea, and Giuliano Ghelli. Luciano Bartolini, born in 1948, died in 1994.

About Luciano Bartolini's works

Luciano Bartolini is known for working in the fields of Abstraction and Expressionism work. Abstract art first started to emerge in the early 20th century, as a new and rather radical form of art. Artists were looking for a way of expressing the societal changes occurring at the time, and release their creative energy, thus distancing themselves from figurative art. With abstraction, the artists move away from any literal representation of reality, and the visual qualities often put in focus in such non-representative works are colours, shapes and textures. Some of the most influential contemporary art movements born from Abstraction include Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, with key figures such as Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali and Jackson Pollock. With abstract art, a sense of self-renewing freedom is materialising through the artworks, in a new tradition of creativity.

Expressionism can often be considered rather as an international tendency than a coherent art movement, which was predominantly significant at the beginning of the twentieth century. It covered various fields such as art, literature, music, theatre and architecture. Expressionist artists sought to express emotional experience, rather than physical reality. World renowned Expressionist paintings include Edvard Munch’s The Scream, Wassily Kandinsky’s Der Blaue Reiter, and Egon Schiele’s Sitting Woman with Legs Drawn Up. Expressionism is a complex and grand term that has meant different things at different times. However, when we speak of Expressionist art, we tend to think about the artistic tendency which followed as a reaction to Impressionism in France, or the movement which appeared in Germany and Austria in the early 20th century. The term is so flexible that it can accommodate artists ranging from Vincent van Gogh to Egon Schiele and Wassily Kandinsky.

Luciano Bartolini's Gallery representation

Luciano Bartolini's work is on display at Galleria Gentili in Firenze, Italy.

Historical Context of Italy

Italy has been vastly rich in cultural power since the time of the Romans, this classical period has exerted a significant influence on the cultural development and identity of the country. Italy also embodies the realm of the Renaissance, called 'Rinascita' in Italian, meaning 'rebirth'. The Renaissance has been considered, from the early 1400s, as the first major blossoming of cultural erudition in art, architecture, music, poetry, philosophy and politics since the Middle Ages. In the modern and contemporary period, Italy was afflicted by the fascism of Mussolini but has nevertheless endured as a vital focal point for artistic expression, initiating movements such as Futurism, Arte Povera and the Minimalism related to the Zero Movement, as well as the expressive painting of the Transavanguardia. Important Italian artists of the twentieth and twenty first centuries include Giorgio Di Chirico, Giacomo Balla, Giorgio Morandi, Alberto Giacometti, Lucio Fontana, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Francesco Clemente and Mimmo Paladino.

Further Biographical Context for Luciano Bartolini

Born in 1948, Luciano Bartolini grew up during the 1960s and was inspired by the artistic culture of the time. The astronomical impact of the 1960s was truly astonishing across the globe. Illustrative of a time stirring both faith and anger, the 1960s triggered an outburst of new philosophies and movements, truly exciting and spectacular. Historically set in the context of the Cold War, which would have a highly powerful impact worldwide, mainly defined by the Iron Curtain dividing Europe both physically and spiritually, and drastically marked by the erection of the Berlin Wall in 1961. The 1960s re-defined all pre-existing assumptions on gender, race and justice, questioned education as well as morality and selfhood – for instance through the civil rights movement and second wave of feminism, as well as student political uprisings. The significant escalation of mass consumerism also defined the era, generating new trends in marketing and advertising. Minimalism developed the crucial idea that art should subsist in its own reality, and not try to mimic the real world. Born of a desire to obliterate all pre-established notions about art, Minimalism turned into a radically progressive movement, highly influential worldwide, with artists such as Frank Stella, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin as key figures. Minimalism became influential through the works of artists such as Victor Vasarely and Bridget Riley, while Pop art was an essential by-product of the latter, at the same time critiquing and glorifying popular culture. The iconic contemporary art movements that echoed through the wave of radicalism of the 1960s also had their own nuances and scopes, particular to different areas or countries. Spatialism, for example, was established in Italy by Lucio Fontana and Piero Manzoni, and its ideologies embraced by the Zero group in Germany. Across Europe, the ideologies of Existentialism strongly influenced artists like Francis Bacon and Alberto Giacometti, who strived to portray the raw human emotions often associated with reflections on death and the lingering angst of the meaninglessness of life.

Luciano Bartolini

  • Exhibitions 3
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