Louis van Lint

1909 - 1986 · Belgium

Artist biography

Louis van Lint was a creative visual artist, who was born in Belgium, like other well-known artists such as Mark Luyten, Dinaya Waeyaert, Noë Sendas, Unknown Artist, and Lysandre Begijn . Louis van Lint was born in 1909 and died in 1986.

Historical Context of Belgium

Throughout the 1930s, Belgian art was to play a integral role in Surrealism, particularly through the work of Rene Magritte and Paul Delvaux. Other important Belgian artists of the twentieth century include Marcel Broodthaers, Wim Delvoye, Francis Alys and Luc Tuymans. Belgium has been an important artistic centre since the later years of the 19th century. As a small country, bordered by both France and the Netherlands, it has been subjected to significant influence by both the French and Flemish cultures. In the late nineteenth century, as the era of the avant-garde in Europe began, the Belgian capital of Brussels was an integral centre for the Art Nouveau movement, which included the architect Victor Horta amongst its founders. The Symbolist movement was also a significant artistic trend that was greatly influenced by Belgian artists. Key practitioners of this important early precursor to Surrealism include Léon Spilliaert, Jean Delville, Fernand Khnopff and James Ensor.

Further Biographical Context for Louis van Lint

Born in 1909, Louis van Lint's creative work was primarily influenced by the 1920s. The 1920s and 1930s saw continued development and evolution of the key innovations of the early years of the twentieth century. To have this time as the formative period for an artist was to be surrounded by incredible practitioners of the pictorial arts. It was also a time of recovery and introspection after the horrors of the First World War, which saw significant shifts in politics. Marxism was a widespread political ideology which was also particularly influential among artists and their communities. The Bauhaus was founded in 1919, and became an important place surrounding notions in favour of the unification of art, craft and design disciplines – an idea that became known as the Gesamtkunstwerk. Surrealism came to be the predominant expressive mode of the 1920s, and was aided by the liberalism of Germany’s Weimar Republic, which was an environment that allowed for remarkable creative developments. notable artistic developments included a kind of expressive mannerism which was epitomised by Brancusi, Modigliani and Soutine in Paris. Surrealism advanced throughout the 1920s and 1930s, with a focus on the human unconscious - a essential idea of Freudian theory. Notable Surrealist artists include Salvador Dali, Giorgio de Chirico, Andre Breton, Rene Magritte and Paul Delvaux. Due to its cultural importance, much of this ideology spread worldwide.