Lars Nørgård

1956 · Denmark

Artist biography

Lars Nørgård is an established contemporary artist, who was born in Denmark. Lars Nørgård was born in 1956. Also born in Denmark around 1956 and of the same generation are Eva Koch and Lise Malinovsky.

About Lars Nørgård's work

Lars Nørgård is recognised for producing abstract work. Born in the early 20th century, abstract art can be characterised as a movement escaping the classical definition of art, which succeeded in creating its own tradition through freedom and a new perception of reality. In abstract artworks, the objects are schematised, modified, and hold little to no reference to the real world. Abstract art represents a fundamental moment in modernism, and its roots can be traced to Impressionism. With Abstraction, the artists are inclined to explore deep into their emotions, and create completely new and liberated representations of the world, which are inherent to their own perception of it. Wassily Kandinsky, who believed that colours and shapes could be used to represent the artist’s inner turmoil, is often considered as a pioneer of abstract art.

Galleries and Exhibitions

Lars Nørgård's work is available on display in 3 galleries recorded on Artland. Galleries include Martin Asbæk Gallery in Copenhagen, as well as Charlotte Fogh Gallery and Galleri Profilen in Aarhus. Lars Nørgård's most recent exhibition recorded on Artland was at Martin Asbæk Gallery in Copenhagen (24 February 2017 until 25 March 2017) with the exhibition Beehive Cockpit. Lars Nørgård's work has also been exhibited during the Roundabout exhibition at Charlotte Fogh Gallery in Aarhus, Denmark (19 September 2019 - 08 November 2019).

Currently on Artland, 14 of Lars Nørgård's works are available to purchase.

Lars Nørgård in private collections

Mads Due and LSH Collection feature Lars Nørgård's works on Artland. They also include works by prominent figures such as Ghizlane Sahli, Paul Cupido, and Jesús Herrera Martínez.

Historical Context of Denmark

As the southernmost of the Scandinavian countries, Denmark has often been very influenced by the Germanic culture of Northern Europe, which borders its southern frontiers. This sensibility is often mixed with the Nordic traits of restraint and melancholy in its arts. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, and in the earlier part of the twentieth, Denmark produced a key painter of Post-Impressionism, Vilhelm Hammershøi. Renowned for his wistful and extremely sparse interiors, Hammershøi's reputation was founded on his exquisite representations of light and shadow in simple, dignified interiors, most often his own residence. In the later twentieth century, Denmark was a major country in the CoBrA movement of Expressionist painting, where the naming convention was derived from the cities of the founding members - the Co standing for Copenhagen on behalf of Danish artist Asger Jorn. Founded in 1949, CoBrA's bright colours and lively childlike figures became both a scandal and sensation. Other critically acclaimed modern and Danish artists include Per Kirkeby, Olafur Eliasson, Danh Vō, Sergej Jensen and Tal R.

Further Biographical Context for Lars Nørgård

Lars Nørgård was born in 1956 and was predominantly influenced creatively by the 1970s. Conceptualism is often perceived as a response to Minimalism, and the leading art movement of the 1970s, challenging the boundaries of art with its revolutionary features. The movements that succeeded were all characteristic of a strong desire to progress and consolidate the art world, in response to the tensions of the previous 1960s. Process art branched out from Conceptualism, highlighting some of its most essential aspects, but going further in creating mysterious and experimental artistic journeys, while Land Art brought creation to the outsides, initiating early ideas of environmentalism. In Germany, Expressive figure painting was given a second chance for the first time since the decline of Abstract Expressionism almost two decades, the genre regained its distinction through the brushstrokes of Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer and Georg Baselitz.

Most of the critically acclaimed artists from the 1960s, who had gained success and popularity, kept their status in the 1970s. Andy Warhol was a prominent figure of those two decades, and in the 1970s started to experiment with film and magazine publishing, thus engaging in a cross-cultural activity that no other visual artist OF his standard had previously undertaken. By doing so, he secured his status as a celebrity.

The multicultural and refined position that New York city held in the 1960s remained just as influential in the 1970s. With multiple global renowned artists gravitating the galleries and downtown scene, the city once again strengthened its reputation as the artistic heart of the era.

Street art started to appear as a true and recognized form of art towards the end of the 1970s. Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring were pioneers in proving that their artworks could exist at the same time in art galleries and on city walls. Driven by graffiti art, street art from its earliest days proved that it could endure in a constant flux of self-transformation, eternally shifting the boundaries of modern art, becoming a truly ground-breaking artistic genre.

Across the globe, numerous movements defined the 1970s. Amongst others, feminism and the innovative radical theories it occasioned strongly influenced the visual culture. Photorealism, which had emerged in the 1960s, also gained critical and commercial success. The critical, prominent artistic pillars of New York city started to embrace painters and sculptors from Latin America.

The critically engaged Mono-Ha movement, comprised of Japanese and Korean artists, blossomed in Tokyo in the 1970s. Discarding conventional ideas of representation, the artists favoured an interpretation of the world through an engagement with materials and an examination of their properties. The artworks would often consist of encounters between natural and industrial materials such as stone, glass, cotton, sponge, wood, oil and water, mostly unchanged intact.

The Arte Povera movement, which emerged in Italy, received global acknowledgement in the 1970s, and leading figures such as Jannis Kounnelis, Mario Merz, and Michelangelo Pistoletto were critically acclaimed.

Lars Nørgård

  • Artworks in Collections 8
  • Exhibitions 2
  • Related Artists

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