Gonzalo Sicre

Spain

The first impression that Gonzalo Sicre's painting causes us (Cádiz, 1967) is his approach to the work of Edward Hopper.

Like the great New York teacher, in his themes there are interior spaces, rural or urban images, immersed in silence, in a real and metaphysical representation at the same time, which convey to the viewer a marked feeling of distance from the environment in which they are represented. Sicre's paintings, like those of Hopper, do not invite to inhabit their spaces, but to contemplate them from the outside.

This effect is achieved by Hopper through an intelligent geometric distribution of the canvas, by a studied game of cold, sharp, and intentionally artificial lights, creating fictitious and non-existent shadows, and by an extraordinary synthesis of the details, qualities of which he also participates Our Cádiz artist. The scenarios created by Hopper appear almost always deserted, and in his paintings we rarely find more than one human figure; and if there is more than one, what stands out is the alienation of the issues and the impossibility of resulting communication, which sharpens loneliness.

Gonzalo Sicre