Christopher Le Brun

1951 · United Kingdom

Artist biography

Christopher Le Brun is seen as an established contemporary artist, who originates from the United Kingdom. Christopher Le Brun was born in 1951. Born in the same country and of the same generation are Lubaina Himid, Anish Kapoor and John Akomfrah.

Galleries and Exhibitions

Christopher Le Brun's work is available on display in several galleries recorded on Artland. The galleries exhibiting Christopher Le Brun's work include Albertz Benda, Lisson Gallery | Tenth Avenue, New York, as well as Lisson Gallery | West 24th Street, New York in the United States. Christopher Le Brun's work has most recently been exhibited at Lisson Gallery | London in the United Kingdom (04 July 2018 until 18 September 2018) with the exhibition New Painting. Christopher Le Brun's other most recent exhibitions listed on Artland include the exhibitions at Lisson Gallery Shanghai in China (05 November 2019 - 27 March 2020) with the name Diptychs and Albertz Benda in the United States (25 October 2018 - 15 December 2018) with the name Under the Night Sky. Christopher Le Brun's first recorded exhibition in Artland's database was called New Painting and took place at Lisson Gallery | London in the United Kingdom from the 04 July 2018 to 18 September 2018.

Historical Context of United Kingdom

The UK has been an important centre for artistic production for centuries. While it gained vast wealth through colonisation and the rise of its Empire, it was also unsheltered from the cultural supremacy of other countries and continents. Throughout the modern period, Britain had been to a great extent eclipsed by the reputation of its European neighbours on one side, and of the United States on the other. But towards the end of the 19th century, Britain became a significant focal point in the development of the avant-garde. This includes the Arts and Crafts Movement, a cutting-edge movement paving the way for artist-led organisations, groups and organisational co-operative types that would later develop into a template of sorts for bohemian artists movements of the Twentieth Century.

Major artistic movements that epitomize British modernism include for example Vorticism, comprised of artists part of the Bloomsbury group. Some notable British artists of the modern and contemporary era include Stanley Spencer, Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Leon Kossoff, Frank Auerbach, David Hockney, Bridget Riley, Paula Rego - and in more recent years the YBA generation led by Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Marc Quinn, Chris Ofili and others.

Further Biographical Context for Christopher Le Brun

Born in 1951, Christopher Le Brun was predominantly influenced by the 1970s growing up. The art sphere of the 1970s was characterized by a longing to evolve and reinforce itself, as a reaction to the many tensions of the previous decade. One of the most important movement of the 1970s was Conceptualism, which appeared as an offshoot of Minimalism, while the experimental, creative journey of Process art materialized by combining essential aspects of Conceptualism with further considerations on art itself. The initial ideas of environmentalism bounced from Land Art, which took art into earth itself, sculpting the land and bringing art to the outdoors. For the first time since the regression of Abstract Expressionism, Expressive figure painting slowly resurfaced and regained its prominence, especially in Germany through the works of world renowned figures Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer and Georg Baselitz.

Most of the leading artistic figures of the 1960s remained greatly influential and admired throughout the 1970s. Andy Warhol, for instance, secured his reputation as a legendary artist, by bifurcating into film and magazine publishing, thus instituting a ground-breaking concept of cross-cultural activity for a visual artist of such popularity

The city of New York persisted as the most prominent artistic hub of the decade, with international artists drifting through the downtown scene, frequenting bars and art galleries, consolidating the idea of New York City as a cosmopolitan and refined cultural capital.

A few noteworthy international movements that defined the era include photorealism, which was initially introduced in the 1960s and reached commercial and critical success in the 1970s, as well as feminism which had a strong impact on the visual culture.

Artists such as Jannis Kounnelis, Mario Merz, and Michelangelo Pistoletto attained international success, as they were widely accepted as renowned members of the Italian movement Arte Povera, much-admired in the 1970s.

Reaching the end of the 1970s, street art, developing from graffiti, was starting to truly captivate the fine art community. Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat helped legitimize spray painting and tagging, demonstrating that their artworks could subsist at the same time in art galleries and in urban settings. Following, the international reach of street art would become extremely influential, representing an astonishing form of artistic expression.

In the eastern part of the globe, Japanese and Korean artists who showed a strong interest in the European ideas of phenomenology, associated with the Mono-Ha movement, exploring and shifting the frontiers between natural and industrial materials. Using stone, glass, cotton, sponge, wood, oil and water, they intended to create life to artworks that would emphasize the ephemeral state of these various elements and their surroundings, playing with their interdependency.

Christopher Le Brun