Charles Giai-Gischia

1956 · France

Artist biography

Charles Giai-Gischia is seen as an established artist, who was born and brought up in France, like other renowned artists such as Jean-Baptiste Valadie, Nicolas Wilmouth, Viviani, Domingo Djuric, and Jean - Baptiste Boyer. Charles Giai-Gischia was born in 1956.

About Charles Giai-Gischia's works

Charles Giai-Gischia's work is illustrative of the fields of Abstraction, Expressionism and Figuration. Abstract art does not try to represent a faithful depiction of a visual reality, or of nature itself, but instead, with the use of colours, gestural elements and shapes tries to achieve its effect. The term can be applied to art that is primarily based on an object, or figure, where the main elements have been simplified. Abstraction has been highly significant in modern art since the 1900s, with its origins grounded in Impressionism. One of the first, most influential movements related to abstraction is Cubism, with artists such as Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, who through their work laid the foundations for an important number of branches of abstract art.

Flourishing between 1905 and 1920, Expressionism represents a movement that influenced literature, architecture, performances and art. Expressionist artists mainly desired to depict the world as it felt, rather than how it looked, thus permitting art to be renewed with an emotional truthfulness and expressive strength. Particularly expanding in Germany and Austria, Expressionists formed groups where they would share studios as well as exhibit or publish their works together - such groups include Die Brücke in Dresden, as well as Der Blaue Reiter in Munich. Although Expressionism can be considered a rather vast term that encompasses a multitude of tendencies, the artworks themselves are often characterized by unplanned gestural marks and distorted representations, that would strive to express the artist’s inner turmoil. Some highly celebrated paintings representative of Expressionism include Edvard Munch’s The Scream, Wassily Kandinsky’s Der Blaue Reiter, and Egon Schiele’s Sitting Woman with Legs Drawn Up.

Often perceived as the contrary of abstraction, figurative art also subsists beyond just a simple depiction of reality. Although it essentially implies the ability to depict a real-world subject, the style, approaches and mediums that can be chosen by the artist are boundless, which gives figurative art the possibility to be truly innovative and radical. Some glorious examples of figurative art include Henri Matisse’s sculpture The Serf, or Pablo Picasso’s painting Les Demoiselles D’Avignon.

Historical Context of France

France strikes out as one of the most prominent agents of modernism. What is today referred to as the avant-garde was pioneered in the first half of the nineteenth century, and embraced progressive and cutting-edge movements such as Impressionism, Post-impressionism and Art Nouveau, driven by key figures of the art sphere. Critically praised and leading French artists from the early years of the twentieth century include Paul Cezanne, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, although he initially was a Spanish national who settled in France, as well as Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, and Le Corbusier, to name a few. Paris was considered to be the most important and intellectual artistic centre at the onset of the century and contributed to the development of such vital movements as Cubism, Fauvism, Dadaism and Surrealism, amongst others, which emerged in the post war era.

Further Biographical Context for Charles Giai-Gischia

Born in 1956, Charles Giai-Gischia was predominantly influenced by the 1970s. The art sphere of the 1970s was epitomized by a longing to evolve and strengthen itself, as a reaction to the many conflicts of the previous decade. One of the most important movement of the 1970s was Conceptualism, which appeared as an offshoot of Minimalism, while the experimental, creative journey of Process art emerged by combining essential aspects of Conceptualism with further considerations on art itself. The initial ideas of environmentalism bounced from Land Art, which took art into earth itself, carving the land and bringing art to the outdoors. For the first time since the decline of Abstract Expressionism, Expressive figure painting slowly re-emerged and regained its prominence, especially in Germany through the works of world renowned figures Gerhard Richter, Anselm Kiefer and Georg Baselitz. Most of the dominant artistic figures of the 1960s remained highly influential and popular throughout the 1970s. Andy Warhol, for example, fortified his status as a legendary artist, by branching out into film and magazine publishing, thus introducing a ground-breaking concept of cross-cultural activity for a visual artist of such fame. Artists such as Jannis Kounnelis, Mario Merz, and Michelangelo Pistoletto attained worldwide success, as they were widely accepted as renowned members of the Italian movement Arte Povera, much-admired in the 1970s.

Charles Giai-Gischia

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