(William) Davenport Griffen

1894 · United States

Artist biography

(William) Davenport Griffen is regarded as a well established artist, who was born in the United States. (William) Davenport Griffen was born in 1894. Artists Man Ray, Norman Rockwell, Robert Brackman, Dorothea Lange and Alexander Calder are of the same generation and same country as (William) Davenport Griffen.

(William) Davenport Griffen's Gallery representation

(William) Davenport Griffen's work is on display at Richard Norton Gallery located in Chicago, the United States.

Historical Context of United States

The US, particularly New York city, endures as a focal point that has played a significant role in developing modern and contemporary art in the twentieth century. The concept of New York as a new cosmopolitan and highly influential art centre appeared in the post war era, and the city succeeded in asserting its dominance over Paris, which used to be regarded as the most powerful international art centre. The predominance of the political and economic structures of the United States in the modern sphere has provided the country with a powerful influence on the visual culture of the world. Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Neo-Expressionism, Graffiti and Street Art, are essential art movements that emerged in the US. These very movements also reverberated into a myriad of variations, such as alternative forms of Abstract Expressionism, as well as East and West Coast adaptations of Pop Art, among others. Some internationally distinguished U.S artists of the modern age include Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Frank Stella, Donald Judd, Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, Julian Schnabel, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.

Further Biographical Context for (William) Davenport Griffen

(William) Davenport Griffen was born in 1894, grew up during the 1900s and 1910s and was inspired by the artistic culture of the time. The first decades of the twentieth century were defined by the vibrant development of visual and pictorial art. These years were an era of experimentation, with artists delving into ideas surrounding Post-Impressionism, Expressionism and Abstraction. These developments inspired artist communities and collectives around the world, with many groups developing a variety of ways of expressing their ideas. After the First World War, artists started to explore psychological uses of art in response to the horrors they had experienced. Dadaism, an absurdist movement inspired directly by the events of the war, spread to many countries across Europe and established the careers of famous artists such as Marcel Duchamp, Francis Picabia, Hannah Höch and Kurt Schwitters. The movement of Surrealism, inspired by ideas concerning psychology and the subconscious which were first developed by Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, was developed from the ideas posed by Dada.